Tool picking

Did some tool picking yesterday and now I have a couple of new projects to work on. The concave spokeshave will come in handy for stool and chair legs, and the moulding plane is the right size for a number of furniture projects I have in mind.

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The concave spokeshave is a two in one is it? It looks unusual can you explain please. Perhaps you could add some more photos of the plane too.

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Do you mean you bought some tools?

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Asking the question many of us were afraid to!

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Tool picking is basically hunting for old tools in antiques shops, auctions, flea markets and junk stores. These are all bought for restoration projects :slight_smile: sorry, I thought it was common enough to use (possibly I need to spend less time on tool restoration forums)

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I will try and get a couple more this week - the two in one is a Stanley design, although this one is unbranded, so I got a much more reasonable price for it.

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Good to know. Thx for explaining. Are the places you ‘tool pick’ secret ?:joy::joy:

They’re probably in Canada…

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Is that where Ed is right now?

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Unfortunately for you, yes!
But if you fancy a day trip, Old English Tools in Faversham might be worth a punt. I didn’t manage to get there before I moved because of C19, but it’s on my eventual list.

@Giles here you go. It’s a cheaper copy of a Stanley 60. I’ll see how it works once I get it all flattened and sharp.

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Right,
Thanks, I have seen that model.
How does the spokeshave with the thumb screw perform? I still don’t have a flat bottom shave. I have two curved sole spokeshaves, regular Stanley pattern and they are fairly useless. The only curved sole pattern which I have ever seen working really well is the boggs pattern but they are pricey I think. I am going to take a look now.

I just had a look, the Quangsheng is like a boggs pattern. A metal bar with thumb screws either side secures the blade.

I bought this recently for ten quid I think.
I recently bought a plastic vernier calliper and I liked it. Especially for thicknessing components. The digital versions are mainly dross unless you spend a few quid and analog are just as bad. Starret and mitutoyo are good and still seem to care about producing real tools but the entry level versions are still quite expensive. The vernier I bought is a cheap generic old version and yet it’s beautifully made, mono block and all the readings tally up. All the jaws are accurately ground. The mechanism is tight and the lock is rock solid. It’s only 0.1 resolution but for woodwork it’s enough.

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Just trying out a new purchase! I find sharpening strangely relaxing !!

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I’ve yet to get them sharp enough to try out properly (busy week) but my favourite is my record 0151 with the two adjustment screws. My cheap foreign copy of the non-screwed one is almost as good, but not quite.

Thx Ed, I might treat myself! Possibly in the summer - there’s a great lido in Faversham!

Oh great, I see you splashed out on the shapton glass. I am loving my shaptons.
I got the shapton pro stones. Best stones I have ever used by a country mile. Easy to flatten and they stay flat, I have timed how long it takes to flatten two stones. Three minutes, and when I am finished they are flat with no groove down the middle. Very little mess and they are very quick. I almost forgot the best feature, splash and go. Basically everything a woodworker wants. The glass and the professional series are loved by woodworkers and knife sharpening enthusiasts rate them too.

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I was expecting to get an 0151 flat sole at Greenwich market but the guy hasn’t had any for ages. He used to have them all the time, Stanley, Record and various other versions. He has interesting tools, I have purchased quite a few. He had a complete groove cutting plane the other day, a quirk router plane of some sort with the weird blade which has a slit in the middle, for inlaying stringing.

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